I’m beginning to think there’s no such thing as a bad dye job in rug hooking. The fibre can always be used somewhere, or at the very least overdyed to make it fit in, or marry, with other fibres.

Earlier this week I made an effort to dye some fibre to replace a plaid. It was for a kit I’ve since backed down on. It didn’t work. I’ve decided kits are low on my priority list.

Back to the dye job that didn’t work. I used two techniques – spot dyeing, where you sprinkle a bunch of spots of dye over scrunched up material and bake in an oven, and painting on wool, where you actually take a paint brush to the wool and paint the dye on. But here’s the rub. I didn’t use paint brushes. I used small 10 cc syringes without the needle.

The spot dyed wool looked better once it dried, but I was pleasantly surprised by how well the painting-on-wool fabric looked when hooked! Check this out!

Dye Samples

I can certainly see trees in the darker painting-on-wool pieces at the bottom of the photo. Yes, the bottom three samples are painting-on-wool. I layered three pieces on top of each other, and thereby sealed my demise. It was a mistake. When painting-on-wool I must remember to do one layer only.

My other mistake was not having a spray bottle to mist the dye setting agent on the fabric. That meant I had to add liquid with the setting agent in it. It was too much liquid.

We all learn from mistakes and I definitely learned from mine. And, thankfully, I managed to make some beautiful wool to hook into my wall hangings.

I hope everyone is having a good week. I’ll write more later!

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