“Huh?”, you ask?  To rug hookers “hit and miss” is a particular type of rug hooking pattern.  It’s great for rug hookers who want to use up scraps.  The procedure is to reach into a bin or bag of mixed colour and texture scrap strips of fibre (also known as worms or noodles) and pull out whatever your hand touches first and hook it. Then repeat, without regard to colour or texture. No planning. That is a hit and miss rug in its purist form.  At least that’s it in theory. I’ve never done that.

Usually most rug hookers put some degree of decision making into a hit and miss project. The closest I’ve ever come is the centre of this welcome mat I made for a family member. It looks like pure hit and miss, but originally I made a conscious decision to intersperse light with dark and, because I didn’t have enough yellow, there was judicious placement of it on the diagonal. This rug is closing in on 35 years old and parts of it have faded.  It’s hard to tell I had such a design problem.

The next hit and miss piece I hooked was a wedding gift for my nephew and his new wife.  He married in Alberta, Canada, so I hooked a rug with pink wild Alberta roses floating above alternating blue and green squares in a controlled hit and miss background. I hooked the blue squares in one direction and the green at right angles.  This style of hit and miss is called basket weave.  The results were striking. To add to the charm of this rug was the Canada tartan kilt border with Hudson’s Bay Company blanket lettering.

The last hit and miss piece I hooked was a hot pad in greens, burgundies and yellows that is featured in the opening photo of this blog post.  It is my Christmas themed hot pad. It has varying widths of fibre. To add interest to the piece I divided the backing into four parts and hooked each part at right angles to the other.

There are many variations of hit and miss rugs.  Charlie Dalton, a contemporary rug hooking artist (google The Hooking Colonel), and instructor at the upcoming In The Studio Workshop Week 4, uses them as backgrounds to his pet portraits.  Google “hit and miss hooked rug” and check out some eye candy!

For further study on such rugs I direct you to William C. Ketchum’s book “Hooked Rugs”, in the chapter on geometrics, and Bea Brock’s “Scrappy Hooked Rugs”, in the gallery section on hit and miss rugs.

If you have been, thanks for reading.  Have a great weekend everyone!

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